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Nothing is waste in mink production

Nothing is waste in mink production
Monday 21, 2016

Fur production is sometimes met with the prejudice that it is an unnecessary luxury production, where most of the animal is discarded. One can not discuss that fur is a luxurious product because of its’ high price but the rest of the animals does not get thrown out but is used to sensible things. Minks are fed with animal residues from the food industry. Residues that otherwise would be destroyed. You can say that fur production is a rewarding part between human food production and the disposal of residues.

The death of the minks happens directly from their cage and then they get cooled down in up to 24 hours before the fur is removed. When the fur is gone, the body of the mink is sent to bio processing at Daka. At Dakas´ they process the residues from animal production in Denmark. The process is performed to benefit as much as possible from the residues. The fat from the mink is used to produce biodiesel. The conversion from animal fat to biodiesel happens at Dakas´ biodiesel fabric. As a bi product you get glycerine and caliumsulfate. From march 2011 glycerine is used as biogas in biogas systems and the caliumsulfate as fertilizer. The biodiesel goes through a destillation to live up to the biodiesel standard, EN14214. This is the access to combine biodiesel with ordinary diesel. The diesel-norm EN 590 accepts the mix of 7% of biodiesel in fossil-diesel - and this is accepted and guarantied by all car manufactures. Bio fuels provides security of supply and also a reduction of CO2.

In Europe, it was decided that the member countries must use 10% renewable energy in the transport sector within 2020. In Denmark it was required to use 5,75% renewable energy from 2012, and that was during the phasing of 5% ethanol in petrol in 2010, and 7% biodiesel in diesel from 2011. Until now, Daka have exported the main part of their biodiesel to the european market but the domestic market is expected to get a larger share in the years to come. The mink body is converted into bone flour which among other things is used as fertilizer or as a fuel for heating purposes, for example in the cement industry. energy accounts for processing mink bodies is positive. 25 % of the recovered energy is used for processing, while 75 % is surplus energy.

Fur production is sometimes met with the prejudice that it is an unnecessary luxury production, where most of the animal is discarded. One can not discuss that fur is a luxurious product because of its’ high price but the rest of the animals does not get thrown out but is used to sensible things. Minks are fed with animal residues from the food industry. Residues that otherwise would be destroyed. You can say that fur production is a rewarding part between human food production and the disposal of residues.

The death of the minks happens directly from their cage and then they get cooled down in up to 24 hours before the fur is removed. When the fur is gone, the body of the mink is sent to bio processing at Daka. At Dakas´ they process the residues from animal production in Denmark. The process is performed to benefit as much as possible from the residues. The fat from the mink is used to produce biodiesel. The conversion from animal fat to biodiesel happens at Dakas´ biodiesel fabric. As a bi product you get glycerine and caliumsulfate. From march 2011 glycerine is used as biogas in biogas systems and the caliumsulfate as fertilizer. The biodiesel goes through a destillation to live up to the biodiesel standard, EN14214. This is the access to combine biodiesel with ordinary diesel. The diesel-norm EN 590 accepts the mix of 7% of biodiesel in fossil-diesel - and this is accepted and guarantied by all car manufactures. Bio fuels provides security of supply and also a reduction of CO2.

In Europe, it was decided that the member countries must use 10% renewable energy in the transport sector within 2020. In Denmark it was required to use 5,75% renewable energy from 2012, and that was during the phasing of 5% ethanol in petrol in 2010, and 7% biodiesel in diesel from 2011. Until now, Daka have exported the main part of their biodiesel to the european market but the domestic market is expected to get a larger share in the years to come. The mink body is converted into bone flour which among other things is used as fertilizer or as a fuel for heating purposes, for example in the cement industry. energy accounts for processing mink bodies is positive. 25 % of the recovered energy is used for processing, while 75 % is surplus energy.

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